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Title of Artwork:
Four Seasons in the Slums with the Homeless
Size: 48inch X 60inch
Tool: Oil paint with fingerprint
Year: 2017
Price: Upon Request

Title of Artwork:

Homeless Son and Poor Elderly Mother
Size: 22inch X 30inch
Tool: Pencil, fingerprint with pencil and ink
Year: 2016

One of the most impressive fingerprint artworks, which draw inspiration from Choi’s own memories of a poor downtown, Washington, DC, titled “Two Cities: Unfinished Human Right”

Title of Artwork:

Human Trafficking II
Size: 22inch X 30inch
Tool: Oil, ink, and fingerprint  
Year: 2017
Price: Upon Request

Human trafficking is a serious crime that violates human rights. Every year, thousands of men, women and children get trafficked. According to Article 3, of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, trafficking includes the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation has many forms, such as the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.

According to a May 2014 report from the International Labor Organization (ILO), an estimated 21 million victims are trapped in modern-day slavery. Of these, 14.2 million (68%) were exploited for labor, 4.5 million (22%) were sexually exploited, and 2.2 million (10%) were exploited in state-imposed forced labor. 55% of trafficking victims around the world are women and girls and 45% are men and boys. The Asia-pacific region accounts for the largest number of forced laborers—11.7 million (56% of the global total). Africa has 3.7 million (18%) followed by Latin America and the Caribbean with 1.8 million (9%).  Countries in central, south-eastern and eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States have 1.6 million (7%). The Developed Economies and European Union account for 1.5 million (7%). There are an estimated 600,000 (3%) victims in the Middle East.


 This artwork of Sang Jin Choi signifies how the human trafficking has to be stopped. The connected amputated arms symbolize that the victims do not have freedom and that it is impossible for them to break out of the forced labor system without the help. Thus, it is important to raise awareness of the issue so more people support the activism to stop human trafficking. The background of this artwork is composed of people’s fingerprints, which stands for determination to stop this crime. Fingerprints have the meaning of legally committing themselves to support. For instance, fingerprinting is used for legal documentation, engagement, law suits, and swearing. This can also be interpreted as the signs of love. All these people who have participated in the Sang Jin’s art are now aware and willing to support the cause. The artist Choi works to serve the weak, the vulnerable and the people who need his help the most. These population include homeless people and the victims of human trafficking. The various colors used in the background stand for how people of various ethnicities, countries and cultures are involved in this project to end trafficking – as social workers, as donors, as supporters, and as victims who want to break the cycle most themselves.

Title of Artwork:
Homeless Man - Payer for housing
Size: 22inch X 30inch
Tool: Pencil, fingerprint with pencil and ink, acrylic paint
Year: 2016

Our gallery advances art and its role in multicultural and multiracial societies through the partnership with the community

Art Submissions
Art submissions must include a picture, cover letter, resume, artist statement, recent articles or reviews about your work, announcement cards from previous exhibitions, title, dimensions, day of completion, and medium of each artwork.

With the submission please include your name, contact info (email & phone number), and home address.

Submit work to appachoi@gmail.com

Background of the artist:

            Since September 21, 2000, Sang Jin Choi has operated a yearly event for children’s art for racial harmony between Korean American and African American communities. This initiative has been co-sponsored by the D.C. Mayor’s Office, Korean Society of Greater Washington, and Action for Peace through Prayer and Aid (APPA).
            Since September 10, 2002, Choi founded a yearly art competition for children with artistic themes focused on fostering racial harmony. To date, 238 African American and Korean American children have participated in this event with grand prix winner Seung Hee Sung. This competition was co-sponsored by the School of Arts, University of Maryland and APPA (UN Economic and Social Council member NGO) with judges: David Jung (Prof. School of Arts, George Mason University), Sandy Kita (Prof. at University of Maryland), Gabriele Strauch (Prof. at University of Maryland), Richard Walker (Prof. at University of Maryland), and Bong Kim (Korean American Artist Association at Washington Metropolitan Area).
            Currently, Choi manages a web gallery called UN JC Gallery (www.unjcgallery.com). The gallery advances art and its role in multicultural and multiracial societies through partnership with the community. It organizes exhibitions, cultural events, and educational programs for artists, art admirers, and the community. It also supports the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through the international organizations and UN consultative status non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
            Choi’s primary calling for the past twenty years, however, has been in the service of the homeless people of downtown Washington D.C. He started helping the poor by giving food, clothing, and providing other necessities for them. Through his organization, APPA (Action for Peace through Prayer and Aid), founded in 1996, he has managed many projects aimed at assisting the poor, including legal aid service, medical clinic service, after-school programs, and church programs for the homeless. Over the years APPA has directly helped more than 11,000 homeless people within the Washington D.C. area and nearly 600,000 all around the United States.” Choi hopes to bring further awareness to the growing numbers of homeless individuals in need, and spread the idea that it is within the mission of all humans to help the less-fortunate who are in need as we would our own brothers and sisters.
            One of the most impressive aspects of Choi’s fingerprint artwork is the communal aspect to its creation:  the fingerprints within each painting have been donated by countless homeless individuals in thanks for the aid given them by Choi and APPA. In such a way, Choi used these fingerprints to symbolize his engagement with and witness of the poor. The grasping hands and the fingerprints combine to symbolize the unifying power of human compassion, even within the poorest of communities. Currently, he has joined the CCAA as an artist, and has begun to explore his newfound passion for painting landscapes. 

 Title of Artwork:
Human Trafficking I
Size: 48inch X 60inch
Tool: Oil paint with fingerprint
Year: 2017
Price: Upon Request

In a world where identity and labels have begun to dominate what it means to be human, Artist Choi strives to convey a sense of support for those in need. Choi harnesses his signature fingerprints of various individuals to symbolize identity, a sense of binding, and a contribution of ourselves to the artwork. These fingerprints often surround a circle focused on individuals in need like victims of human trafficking, the homeless, etc... They are printed on by many volunteers with mixed media meant to symbolize supporting these individuals and surrounding them with love.

This particular art piece is the second part of his Human Rights series, focusing on victims of human trafficking. It is centered around a girl that has been abandoned and has fallen into the trap of trafficking, alcohol, and drugs. She falls hunched over a bench; homeless and hopeless.  A large, endless wall circles around her, showing no mercy or signs of exit. She has been abandoned, but a small white circle shines behind her. This white circle and the white surrounding her represents hope and human dignity that resides both inside and outside of her. The fingerprints’ wide array of colors represents the many different ethnicities, ages, and backgrounds of those people who volunteered to print onto the canvas. The colors that are associated with races like black, yellow, and brown are represented proportionately, while the white represents intersectionality. They overpower the brick wall to show support and solidarity with this individual. 

UN JC Gallery

Sponsored by ​Action for Peace through Prayer and Aid

​UN Economic and Social Council Member Status NGO


In his artwork, titled Four Seasons in the Slums with the Homeless, Artist Sang Jin Choi displays the anguish of the poor and homeless in downtown slums. It is an art piece that emphasizes current wrongdoings, but at the same time promotes an ideal change for the future. Artist Choi portrays numerous abandoned buildings, which work to create a dark and bleak mood to most of the painting. These buildings are depicted as being in very poor condition, as seen by their broken windows, peeling paint, and collapsing walls. The artist utilizes his imagination to represent them as having been abandoned for what seems to be a long time.

The message that Artist Choi wishes to get across is his hope for the future, which is that the desolate image of this poor town will be able to transform into a beautiful and colorful community. The bottom line is that there are an array of buildings just like those shown, but little to none of them are given to the homeless, who are in great need of access to areas like these. A more inclusive and welcoming future would require the government avidly working remodel to these buildings and offer them to the economically and socially unfortunate as houses or serving locations.

The painting also has four sections in total, and all are divided by using parallel lines which act as the flat ground for the downtown area. These sections each represent a season, transitioning from the bottom to the top as winter, spring, summer, and fall.

In the center, Artist Choi depicts a homeless man lying down in the corner of a downtown building. The man has covered himself in a thin blanket in a futile effort to fight against the cold winter weather. The significance of locating this person at the middle is to emphasize how the agony of the poor and homeless are truly the focus of this painting, especially since the aim of the piece is to bring about reform for them. This purposeful placement also shows how these unfortunate individuals deserve to be both recognized and dignified, as they are indeed vindicated human beings who are blessed by God.

The dots of varying vivid colors, which can be seen scattered throughout the canvas and become noticeably denser as towards the center, were created by using the fingerprints of both the painter himself and others as a painting tool. This small but clearly prevalent addition to the painting is its most important aspect. It symbolizes the collective cooperation of active supporters towards one common cause: to revamp these poor downtown areas into a place that is returned to the poor.

Title of Artwork:
Two Cities: Unfinished Human Right
Size: 22inch X 30inch
Tool: fingerprint with pencil and ink
Year: 2017

Artist Sang Jin Choi
1-571-259-4937
appachoi@gmail.com
3670 Joy Lane, Waldorf, MD 20603